Last month, we concluded our Kubernetes for Developers series. A huge thanks to everyone who was a part of this journey with us! The adoption of Kubernetes as a container orchestrator has been increasing at a tremendous pace. While SREs and DevOps engineers are already familiar with it, we saw that there was a gap when it comes to developers' knowledge of Kubernetes. This was the problem we wanted to solve through this series - we wanted to familiarize developers with some essential Kubernetes concepts and show them how they too can leverage its benefits!

In the first article, we explored what Kubernetes does and took a little peek under the hood to see the components generally present in a Kubernetes cluster. Then we went on to look at Pods which are the most fundamental object Kubernetes offers. We learned that they are ephemeral and often managed using another Kubernetes object - Deployments. In the third article, we learned how configuration data is passed to a Kubernetes cluster with the help of ConfigMaps and Secrets. We also looked at how Volumes and Persistent Volumes are used in Kubernetes to handle storage. Then in the final article, we looked at two slightly more complicated Kubernetes objects, Services, and Ingresses. We saw how to use Services to enable interaction between different microservices part of our application. We then took a look at the Ingress object, which allows us to set up rules to route traffic to different services. And that concluded our series :)

Here's a list of all the articles part of this series:

  1. Getting Started with Kubernetes as a Developer

  2. Fundamental Kubernetes Concepts Everyone Needs To Know

  3. Configuration and Storage in Kubernetes

  4. Services and Ingresses in Kubernetes

If you want to learn more about Kubernetes, the best way is to start getting your hands dirty. Start containerizing projects you might have made earlier and try deploying them on a Kubernetes cluster. If you run into trouble or need to know more about a particular Kubernetes object - head over the Kubernetes documentation. After going through this series, you should be able to look up and understand most things in detail from the documentation.

For deploying stuff on Kubernetes, there are many ways to go, even if you're looking for a free solution to try things out. One of them is running a K8s cluster locally using Minikube or Kind. Another is using something like Okteto. I'm biased towards the second one 😛 but for good reason!

If you go the second route, not only will you get everything you get with a traditional cluster, but you'll also see how we're leveraging Kubernetes to make lives easy for developers. Okteto Cloud gives you access to a Kubernetes cluster without you having to worry about the infrastructure and the operations side of things. But what makes us special is that if you install the okteto cli you can start a development container in Okteto Cloud. This allows you to code locally and see the result live in a version of your application deployed on Kubernetes. In short, we make developing on Kubernetes very very easy. Wanna see it in action? We've got a super concise 5 minute getting started guide ready for you! 😀

So that was it for this series, if you have any doubts related to Kubernetes or Okteto, feel free to hop on to the #okteto channel on the Kubernetes slack to talk to us. We'd also love to hear how you found the series or if you have any suggestions for what we should be covering next. Until next time! 😁